Currently reading

The Art of Fiction: A Guide for Writers and Readers
Ayn Rand, Tore Boeckmann, Leonard Peikoff
The Name of the Rose
Umberto Eco
Ghostwritten
David Mitchell
To the Lighthouse
Virginia Woolf
The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Edward Gibbon, Daniel J. Boorstin, Gian Battista Piranesi, Hans-Friedrich Mueller
Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid
Douglas R. Hofstadter
Perfect Wrong Note - Learning to Trust Your Musical Self
William Westney
The Prince
Niccolò Machiavelli
The Varieties of Religious Experience
William James
Twenty Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy
G. Lee Bowie, Robert C. Solomon

Steve Jobs: A Biography

Steve Jobs - Walter Isaacson As long as this book was, I feel like it could have easily gone on another couple hundred pages. Most of what's in the beginning of the book we know from other bios and the end, everything from about the first iPod on, seems to go by in a blur. There isn't a lot of technical detail and the way the design process is explained seems superficial at times.Criticisms aside though, the book gives a lot of insight into who Jobs was. While I'm still in awe of what he accomplished in his life, it's somewhat depressing to think that it takes this kind of personality to do what he did. Maybe a company like Apple could be the product of someone more humane and less flawed in his relationships, but as far as I know, it hasn't happened yet.Jobs had his moments of compassion but it seems like they were far and few between. He'll be remembered more for what he created, the great, and often controversial, leaps forward in technology that he led and most importantly, for pushing people to do more than they ever thought they could.